Coronavirus (COVID-19) Awareness

As the coronavirus spreads to multiple countries, Croswell Lexington Community Schools is watching the progress closely with our students’ safety in mind.

The district has created and will update this webpage as the virus progresses, to provide information and resources to the community.

There are two presumptive positive cases of the virus in Michigan, according to Gov. Gretchen Whitmer on March 10, 2020. The cases are not yet confirmed positive by the CDC.

But preparation and awareness is important and this page is a location for resources and verified information.

Virus Background

CDC is responding to an outbreak of respiratory disease caused by a novel (new) coronavirus that was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China and which has now been detected with more than 100,000 cases around the world. The virus has been named “SARS-CoV-2” and the disease it causes has been named “coronavirus disease 2019” (abbreviated “COVID-19”).

CDC Recommendations

While the immediate risk of this new virus to the American public is believed to be low at this time, everyone can do their part to help us respond to this emerging public health threat:

 

  • It’s currently flu and respiratory disease season and CDC recommends getting a flu vaccine, taking everyday preventive actions to help stop the spread of germs, and taking flu antivirals if prescribed.
  • If you are a healthcare provider, be on the look-out for people who recently traveled from China and have fever and respiratory symptoms.
  • If you are a healthcare provider caring for a COVID-19 patient or a public health responder, please take care of yourself and follow recommended infection control procedures.
  • If you have been in China or have been exposed to someone sick with COVID-19 in the last 14 days, you will face some limitations on your movement and activity. Please follow instructions during this time. Your cooperation is integral to the ongoing public health response to try to slow spread of this virus. If you develop COVID-19 symptoms, contact your healthcare provider, and tell them about your symptoms and your travel or exposure to a COVID-19 patient.
  • For people who are ill with COVID-19, please follow CDC guidance on how to reduce the risk of spreading your illness to others.

Staying healthy

From the St. Clair County Health Division

The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to the virus. The simple everyday actions you can take to help prevent the spread of flu and the common cold will also help prevent the spread of coronaviruses.

These include: 

  • Washing your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, and help young children do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, then throwing the tissue in the trash.
  • Avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoiding close contact, such as kissing, sharing cups, or sharing eating utensils, with people who are sick.
  • Cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs.

 

 

 

 

 

If you feel sick

From the Center for Disease Control and Prevention
 

If you are sick with COVID-19 or suspect you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, follow the steps below to help prevent the disease from spreading to people in your home and community.

Stay home except to get medical care
 

You should restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care. Do not go to work, school, or public areas. Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.

Separate yourself from other people and animals in your home
 

People: As much as possible, you should stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom, if available.

Animals: You should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would around other people. Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus. When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick. If you are sick with COVID-19, avoid contact with your pet, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with pets and wear a facemask. See COVID-19 and Animals for more information.

Call ahead before visiting your doctor
 

If you have a medical appointment, call the healthcare provider and tell them that you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to keep other people from getting infected or exposed.

Wear a facemask
 

You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) or pets and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live with you should not stay in the same room with you, or they should wear a facemask if they enter your room.

Cover your coughs and sneezes
 

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw used tissues in a lined trash can; immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60 to 95% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty.

Clean your hands often
 

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60 to 95% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid sharing personal household items
 

You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home. After using these items, they should be washed thoroughly with soap and water.

Clean all “high-touch” surfaces everyday
 

High touch surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables. Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them. Use a household cleaning spray or wipe, according to the label instructions. Labels contain instructions for safe and effective use of the cleaning product including precautions you should take when applying the product, such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.

Monitor your symptoms
 

Seek prompt medical attention if your illness is worsening (e.g., difficulty breathing). Before seeking care, call your healthcare provider and tell them that you have, or are being evaluated for, COVID-19. Put on a facemask before you enter the facility. These steps will help the healthcare provider’s office to keep other people in the office or waiting room from getting infected or exposed. Ask your healthcare provider to call the local or state health department. Persons who are placed under active monitoring or facilitated self-monitoring should follow instructions provided by their local health department or occupational health professionals, as appropriate.

If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, notify the dispatch personnel that you have, or are being evaluated for COVID-19. If possible, put on a facemask before emergency medical services arrive.

Discontinuing home isolation
 

Patients with confirmed COVID-19 should remain under home isolation precautions until the risk of secondary transmission to others is thought to be low. The decision to discontinue home isolation precautions should be made on a case-by-case basis, in consultation with healthcare providers and state and local health departments.

State of Michigan (Governor, MDHHS) information

Gov. Whitmer statement on first confirmed cases (March 10, 2020)

Michigan announces first presumptive positive cases of COVID-19

Governor Whitmer declares a state of emergency to maximize efforts to slow the spread

LANSING, Mich. – Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) and the Oakland County Health Division and Wayne County Health Department announced today that two Michigan residents tested presumptive positive for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the first confirmed cases in the state. The governor has declared a state of emergency to maximize efforts and assist local governments and officials to slow the spread of the virus.

“We are taking every step we can to mitigate the spread of the virus and keep Michiganders safe,” said Governor Whitmer. “I have declared a state of emergency to harness all of our resources across state government to slow the spread of the virus and protect families. It’s crucial that all Michiganders continue to take preventative measures to lower their risk, and to share this information with their friends, family, and co-workers.”

One of the cases is an adult female from Oakland County with recent international travel and the other is an adult male from Wayne County with recent domestic travel. Clinical specimens were collected and sent to the MDHHS Bureau of Laboratories where both tested presumptive positive for COVID-19. Specimens will be sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for confirmatory testing.

“We are taking the identification of COVID-19 in our state very seriously,” said Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, chief medical executive and chief deputy for health. “We continue to urge Michiganders to take precautions to prevent the spread of this virus in our state.”

"This patient in Wayne County is currently under isolation. Our Public Health Division is working to identify individuals who may have come into close contact with the patient so we can take appropriate steps and monitor them closely,” said Wayne County Executive Warren C. Evans. “We are continuing to collaborate with the state health department and recommend residents continue to practice prevention measures to slow the spread of COVID-19.”

“Oakland County and our Health Division will investigate the circumstances around this case so we understand if there are any potential close contacts," said Oakland County Executive Dave Coulter. "We must all as individuals and communities continue our prevention and preparedness strategies as we hope for a full recovery for this member of the community.”

Local health departments will be working diligently to identify anyone who has come in close contact with these cases and recommend they be assessed for symptoms and monitored appropriately.

There are steps residents can take to prevent spread of flu and the common cold that will also help prevent coronavirus disease, including:

  • Washing your hands with soap and water.
  • Avoiding touching your eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Covering your mouth and nose with a tissue or upper sleeve when coughing or sneezing.
  • Avoiding contact with people who are sick.
  • Staying home if you are sick and contact your healthcare provider.

COVID-19 Symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as long as 14 days after exposure to the virus. They include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of Breath

The State of Michigan and MDHHS will announce additional recommendations to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 tomorrow afternoon.

This is a rapidly evolving situation. Updates will be posted to Michigan.gov/Coronavirus and CDC.gov/Coronavirus.

MDHHS and MDE joint letter for schools (Feb. 28, 2020)

DATE: February 28, 2020

TO: Local and Intermediate School District Superintendents, Public School Academy Directors, Nonpublic School Administrators, Public Health Officers, Public Library Directors

FROM: Dr. Michael F. Rice, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Michigan Department of Education, Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, Chief Medical Executive and Chief Deputy for Health, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

SUBJECT: COVID-19 Updated Guidance

Currently, the State of Michigan has no confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, but the state is closely monitoring the situation as knowledge evolves daily. Today, Governor Whitmer announced the activation of the State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) where state, local, and federal agencies will coordinate statewide readiness and communication related to COVID-19. The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) will continue actively preparing, monitoring, and coordinating response activities through the SEOC.

At this time, the health risk to the general public of Michigan from COVID-19 remains low, but schools and public libraries can take commonsense precautions to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Person-to-person spread of COVID-19 appears to spread via respiratory transmission. Symptoms are similar to those of influenza (e.g., fever, cough, and shortness of breath). The current outbreak is occurring during a time of year when respiratory illnesses from influenza and other viruses are highly prevalent.

For schools, we all need to do what we can to keep students and staff engaged in the learning process while mitigating the spread of infections. We strongly recommend that schools and school districts partner with their local health departments to:

  • Report influenza-like activity, absenteeism, and potential school dismissals.
  • Educate students and the community about COVID-19.

Other recommendations for schools, public libraries, and public health agencies include:

  • Educating students, parents, library patrons, and staff regarding preventative hygiene practices including:
  • Remain at home if you are sick and avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are unavailable.
  • Cover cough with a tissue or sleeve. Provide adequate supplies within easy reach, including tissues and no-touch trash cans.
  • Routinely clean frequently touched surfaces.
  • Separate sick students and staff from others until they can go home. When feasible, identify a “sick room” through which others do not regularly pass.
  • Examine existing contracts for any employee issues or stipulations if school is dismissed or if staff are asked to stay home if they are ill.
  • Review school curriculum and ensure plans are adaptable and flexible to ensure the required hours of instruction are completed.
  • Investigate how your meal programs and after-school programs may be affected if you have to dismiss a school in your district or cancel large gatherings of individuals for sporting events, concerts, or celebrations.
  • Schools should engage directly with their local health departments in preparing parental communications.
  • Encourage influenza vaccines to help avoid other seasonal respiratory illness.
  • Review additional documentation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC has developed guidance for child care programs, K-12 schools, and colleges/universities. Those documents are available at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/specific-groups/guidance-for-schools.html

Decisions to exclude a student or staff member, or to close schools altogether, must be taken on a case-by-case basis, in coordination with local health departments. These decisions are local in nature and could vary from district to district or school to school.

MDHHS has developed a COVID-19 website located at michigan.gov/coronavirus. It is updated regularly with the most current available information. We encourage you to visit the website for tools to assist you with your preparations.

We will continue to share with you as more information becomes available. Thank you for all you do to keep Michigan schools and communities safe.

CLCS information releases

girl washing hands

Coronavirus explanatory video

Video transcript

 

Reputable Information sources

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